Birmingham Buildings Past and Present – The Thomas Underwood Gallery – Part 2

The remaining sketches.

Inns

Ten Inns and the first Hotel in Birmingham.

The first selection of Thomas Underwood sketches for the gallery consisted of scenes around New Street and the High Street. This second selection includes the ten remaining Inns in the collection and another Hotel, the first Hotel in Birmingham.

Shops

Shops from around Birmingham.

In addition to the shops in the New Street and High Street section the the Thomas Underwood collection also has the shops shown here. The range of goods goes from buttons and shirts to tripe, vinegar, coffee and peppers and to hats and coats with one unidentifiable product. Then there are some houses with adverts that make it look like one large billboard.

The Post Office New Street ca 1815
The Post Office New Street ca 1815
The original caption states “From a sketch made about 50 years since” which puts this at about 1815. The view point would be close to the Theatre and shows the dome of St Philip’s Church in the background. The house number would be around 70.
Attwood and Spooner's Bank, New Street
Attwood and Spooner's Bank, New Street
It was founded by Isaac Spooner, Aaron Attwood and others in 1791 and collapsed in March 1865 with liabilities of around £1 million. There is no indication of its position in New Street.
The Whip Manufactory, New Street
The Whip Manufactory, New Street
The Manufactory is up the stairs between the shops of Cornish and Underhill. Underhill is at No 39. There is now a No 41 between Cannon Street and Needless Alley, and No 32 is at the corner of Corporation Street
Phipson's Metal Warehouse New Street
Phipson's Metal Warehouse New Street
No indication of position.
Hen and Chickens Hotel
Hen and Chickens Hotel
From a sketch made in about 1833. The right hand side shows the tower and two wings of the Free Grammar School. This ceased being used in 1832 and was demolished to make way for a new building for the school. There is a wall plaque now at 135A New Street which states, inter alia, that it was the site of King Edward VI School from 1552 to 1936. The Free Grammar School was its earlier name.
New Street, corner of Worcester Street
New Street, corner of Worcester Street
On the left hand side there can just be seen the Swan Hotel. In Fig 2 the Swan Inn is shown with what looks like an entrance off High Street. The corner shop of W Jones carries a No. 134. If that is meant to be New Street it poses a problem with the Grammar School at 135.
A View of High Street Birmingham  1812
A View of High Street Birmingham 1812
Copied from a large print published in 1812, showing the Statue of Lord Nelson, which was unveiled on October 25th 1809.
The Nelson Hotel
The Nelson Hotel
From a sketch made in about 1833. In 1811 it was the Dog Inn. In 1833 it is the Nelson Hotel and in Spiceal Street.
High St & Court of Requests
High St & Court of Requests
Probably from a sketch around 1830.The Court of Requests was the building down the alleyway on the right, and dealt with the settlement of small debts. Here it seems to be more concerned with pale ale and stout. The shop numbering is consecutive and with a half squeezed in. The numbering is 29 to 32. The present Waterstones is 24-26, very close by.
Castle Inn
Castle Inn
From a sketch made in about 1833. In Fig2 it is at the junction of High Street and Castle Street and appears to be on both sides of Castle Street
Old House in High Street  1830
Old House in High Street 1830
From a sketch made in 1830.

This group includes the well known print of “The North prospect of St Philips” and a rather unusual perspective of Pinfold Street. It was a narrow street, as some maps indicate, but appears here as a wide open space. The top half of prints No7 and No 8 represented the houses as they stood in 1865, and were threatened with demolition, and the bottom half the buildings in the street that were demolished for the railway developments. The particular attraction of print No 4 is the name of the carrier!

Remaining Sketches

The remainder of the sketches from the Thomas Underwood Gallery.

Two of the Sketches, the South West Prospect and the East Prospect of Birmingham, are too big for my scanner, so I have limited both of them to the middle part of the Sketch.

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